Volunteer blog – ‘Development of the Area’

Joanna takes us through the continued urban growth and development of Midland Road, Derby.

This week I am looking at the area on the south side of Midland Road where the W. W. Winter premises are situated. This has been an area of much change since the development of the 1850s. Again maps, both commercial and those produced alongside planning applications have been helpful. Together with Directories of the area it has been possible to build a picture of life in the area over the years.

The development probably in 1854 seems to have started at the London Road end with premises on the corner, now Philatelic Auctions. The Winter’s studio sits between this and a building c.1857 containing two shops and a vehicular entrance leading to a yard. The plots between this and Lower Carrington Street were occupied by yards relating to building supplies and services, to be replaced over the years by shops.

A tramway depot and stables occupied the corner of Lower Carrington Street and Midland Rd for a short time. The 1880 OS map shows the tramlines running into it. This was followed by the Post Office building and a row of shops including John Hopley Dodd’s furniture emporium.  The shops and old PO building were demolished in the 1960s along with the yard used by W. W. Winter’s and replaced with the concrete building seen today.

The W. W. Winter premises date from 1867 the only reference for this being the date in the decoration above the side entrance. More about this next time. 

Volunteer blog – ‘Midland Road’

This weeks post from Joanna gives us an insight to the growth of Derby on what would have originally been the Castlefields estate.

Looking at maps and plans has always been a big part of my research, ‘the where’ aspect helps to fit another piece into the jigsaw of the history of the Winter’s business.

The part of Derby known as Litchurch was originally its own place and mentioned in the Domesday Book. Records show that by 1841 there were only 855 persons recorded. By 1877 this had risen to nearly 70,000 due to the selling of the Castlefields estate, the subsequent development of the area and the coming of the railway. The Litchurch Local Board was set up in 1860. Mr Winter became a member of this, playing an active role in the management of the area. The area was finally integrated into Derby under the Local Government Act of 1877. Mr Winter was then elected to the Council as member for the Litchurch Ward.

The coming of the railway triggered the development of the area. This major railway junction made travel to and from Derby to the north, south, east and west much easier. It also brought about the Railway Village built to house railway workers, and manufacturing industries on a big scale. Streets were laid out and the boom years began. Into this major expansion came Monsieur E. N. Charles. The buildings in Station Road, as Midland Road was then known, were under construction at the time of the 1851 Census but are clearly marked on the 1852 map commissioned by the Board of Health. It is here that M. Charles had his premises. These buildings on the north side of Midland Road today between London Road and Carrington Street are the original buildings. The same 1852 Board of Health map shows no building at all on the south side, the site of the present Winter’s premises, between London Road and the Midland Hotel (opened 1843). It is marked as pasture land in the owned by J. Cuff, manager of the hotel at the time.  Development on this side began with the corner of London Road towards the end of the 1850s.

The premises housing the original studio remained as part of the Winter’s business into the 20th Century. The photograph of the framing room on display in an upstairs room at the present studio is actually the front upstairs room of these premises. The roofline and chimney of the present studio can be seen through the window. The framer is Mr Samuel Wain who worked at W.W. Winter’s from 1889 to 1914. 

 I hope to continue with the story of the development of Midland Road next time.

If Joanna’s research has whet your appetite for more land history there is an interesting article in Country Image Magazine about the history of the Castlefields, now known as Castleward in Derby.

Volunteer blog – ‘Both Sides of the Law’

Read on for some tantalizing findings from Joanna’s research regarding Winter’s business and the law. We can see how research brings history to life!

Having spent a lot of time during the present lockdown sorting out my W. W. Winter notes, I have come across several items of interest. Searching through the newspaper archives always results in finding more than the matter that you are focusing on. Usually I jot down the reference and an outline of the subject to go back to it later. These unrelated notes have now been revisited and filed appropriately.

The Derby Mercury, Derby Daily Telegraph and other provincial newspapers have been an invaluable resource for information about Winter’s, some articles appearing in newspapers as far away as Aberdeen and Cardiff. This week I am writing about the business’s experiences with both sides of the law.

In an 1857 edition of the Nottinghamshire Guardian it was reported that Mr E. N. Charles, W. W. Winter’s predecessor had appeared before the magistrates charged with taking photographs on a Sunday it not being a necessity. The case was dismissed with a caution as it was ‘his man’ who took the photographs not Mr Charles himself.

As reported by the Derby Mercury 2 November 1880 Mr Winter appeared in court charged with breaching the law by erecting a building without notice to the Sanitary Authorities. This building had been a temporary structure for use on Arboretum Day. He was fined 10 shillings (50p) plus costs.

W. W. Winter’s also had its share of shoplifting and fraud.

In the Derby Mercury 26 November 1879 it was reported that a charge was made against a Mr Luger of stealing 6 books and 13 paper bags valued at 13 shillings (65p). The case was sent to trial outcome unknown.

The Derby Daily Telegraph 13 November 1884 reported that three boys had been charged with stealing a mouth organ from Winter’s and 80 cigars from Mr Sander’s shop. They each received 6 strokes of the birch. 

A further incident caused Mr Winter to place a notice in the 9 July 1904 edition of the Derby Daily Telegraph to the effect that Mr W. Anderson was not authorised to collect money in his (W.W.W.) name.

Volunteer blog – ‘Researching Images’

This week Joanna talks about some of the processes of researching the images for the Trust:

Hope everyone is coping with the lockdown. Thank goodness for the internet which enables me to carry on with research. Also I have been through my Winter’s notes and put things in some sort of order, tied up some loose ends and reminded myself of things I had forgotten.

Apart from cleaning, sorting and recording, one of the most interesting things that I do is finding out about the stories behind the prints and negatives. I have always been interested in the development of Derby and family history, so having the opportunity to look at old photographs I was in seventh heaven. A quote from the Derbyshire Post of July 1885 sums it up in better words than I can. The words were written by a reporter who was making a tour of the Winter’s premises after a major building programme after the fire of 1883.

‘’….the plate when printed goes to a negative room to be added to the 50,000 other plates there. Here they are ticketed and laid aside till fate requires them. If each one could tell the tale of why it came to be there, many an interesting history could be told; tales of happiness, woe, love or disappointment….’’

When researching a print or plate it is mainly a matter of looking for clues – who, when, what, why, hence the importance of looking at all the information that you can gather from the print/negative and the bag that it might be in however intelligible it may seem at first. The negative number will give an approximate date; names are usually written on the negative and often on the bag. Prints often have the negative number written on the back, then it is a case of what you know personally or what you can find in a book or on the internet. The recent find of the name of the rower Orlando Meakin is a good example. The name on the bag was easily read as ‘Meakin’ the initial was a squiggle. Looking through newspaper articles and finding an O. Meakin rowing in the approximate year. The ancestry website led to an Orlando Meakin. And then, the researcher’s dream, a newspaper article of his obituary filled in the details. It is like a big newspaper puzzle, trying to relate one piece of information to another and hoping it will fall into place. I hasten to add that it is not always as successful as that one, luckily the name was unusual.

Volunteer blog – ‘Working with Artefacts’

Our next instalment from Joanna on the experience of volunteering as well as her insights and knowledge of W W Winter:

Last week I wrote about cleaning and archiving glass plate negatives; another part of my time at Winter’s has been tidying, sorting and cleaning artefacts. Winter’s is full of rooms, cubby holes, and roof spaces, and the cellar. When I first came to Winter’s I found it hard to work out which roof space belonged to which bit and which room was where in relation to the others! When the new post office block was built in the 1960s Winter’s buildings were sadly curtailed. There is information about the ‘lost rooms’ on the wall at the bottom of the stairs leading up to the retouching room. Articles from these rooms were pushed into what space remained and many of the plate negatives ended up in a pile of broken glass in the cellar.

Helped by Louisa’s lovely Mum I set about cleaning, sorting and listing many of the artefacts that had been found. These could be letters, documents, boxes of paints, pencils, brushes, bottles, cases for carrying equipment …….the list is endless, also the larger items, props, furniture and photographic equipment.  We did wonder why there was a pair of black nylon stockings – apparently they made excellent light filters – and a cream maker (! ) we haven’t worked that one out yet. Armed with the natural hair brushes and e-cloths we attempted to remove years of grime and restore some order in this wonderful place

 

Volunteer blog – ‘Aspects of Volunteering’

This period of social isolating in the UK has meant that the incredible efforts of our volunteers have had to be paused. We have invited them to share with you some of their experiences which hopefully will give you an insight into the experience of volunteering at Winter’s. We’re really missing our little heritage family and look forward to things returning to normal; but in the meantime, please enjoy our heritage blog posts!

We (Malcolm and Joanna) have been volunteers at Winter’s for over four years now. He came because of his interest in photography and me because ”we would like to find out about the history of the place and the families who owned and worked at the business.”

Armed with green then blue rubber gloves and natural fibre brushes we have cleaned what seems like hundreds of glass plate negatives – who knew tar sprayers came in so many varieties (with and without chimneys, with metal rimmed wheels, wheels with tyres, big wheels, small wheels). And the negative numbers … Negative numbers presumably started at 1 when the business started and continued in a consecutive manner until a new system was introduced in 1959 , using the last two year numbers as a prefix hence 631234 was photographed in 1963! All the information is entered into a computer and the glass negatives scanned.

Then there is the print collection, and the equipment, as well as open days, exhibitions and projects……….More about some of those next time.

People Power!

As part of heritage Open Days 2019 we did own research on the theme of people power. Heritage Open Days offered the following inspiration:

Using the British Newspaper Archives we were able to delve in to the civic life of W. W. Winter, and share here some of what he got up to outside of the studio!

PEOPLE POWER | Walter William Winter

 On 27th May 1910 after nearly fifty years of working as a photographer in Derby, Walter William Winter travelled on the S. S. Corsican with his wife, Hannah, and two children (Walter Francis and Annie Marjorie) to begin a new life in Canada. Over those fifty years Winter made a name for himself, not only as a photographer, but as an active member of his community. Searching through the various Derby publications from the British Newspaper Archives from 1863 to 1910 gives us some idea of the civic duty and social conscience that wove its way through his life.

Early Years

In 1860, as a teenager in Great Yarmouth, a young Walter joined the Volunteer 2nd Norfolks.

On 12 May 1859 the Secretary of State for War, Jonathan Peel issued a circular letter to lieutenants of counties in England, Wales and Scotland, authorising the formation of volunteer rifle corps (VRC, a.k.a. corps of rifle volunteers and rifle volunteer corps), and of artillery corps in defended coastal towns.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volunteer_Force

 The 1st Norfolk Artillery Volunteer Corps (AVC) was formed at Great Yarmouth on 29 September 1859, with further batteries being added on 23 February and 4 June 1860, and 26 December 1862.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1st_Norfolk_Artillery_Volunteers

An obituary also mentions that he became a special constable during the Fenian Rising and other newspaper articles suggest he was interested in the volunteer rifle corps in Derby. These interests give way, however, to a civilian approach.

A Citizen of Derby

By 1863 Winter had been in Derby for around a year. While he appears on the 1861 census in Great Yarmouth, he is soon mentioned in an announcement in a Derby newspaper dated April 6 1863:

Madame Charles in respectfully returning her sincere thanks to the Nobility, Gentry, and Clergy of Derby and its vicinity, for the kind patronage and long support bestowed upon her late Husband, begs to announce that she has happily secured the further services of Mr W. W. Winter, who has so very successfully practised as Artist to Mons. Charles, and with whose Professional assistance it is her intention to carry on the Photographic Business as heretofore, when she hopes to merit a continuance of their kind support.

We can only speculate as to what brought him to Derby – although the burgeoning Midland Railway must have created a hub of opportunities – but he settled quickly into life here. His job working for Monsieur Charles on Midland Road, Derby, landed him right at the centre of an intense period of growth for the local area.

 [The Midland Railway] was formed on 10 May 1844 by the merger of the Midland Counties Railway, the North Midland Railway, and the Birmingham and Derby Junction Railway, the Birmingham and Gloucester Railway joined two years later. These met at the Tri-Junct station at Derby, where the MR established its locomotive and later its carriage and wagon works.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midland_Railway

Such was the rapid expansion of the population around The Midland Railway that the township of Litchurch was formed in 1860 (not to be confused with the current Litchurch Ward area of Derby), and Litchurch became a civil parish in 1866.

Being so close to the station and rail works, E. N. Charles’ choice of site had set the young Winter up to be right at the centre of this burgeoning population of rail workers.

Throughout his career, Winter attended public events with his camera. In 1865 he photographed the Florence Nightingale Lifeboat. The lifeboat was paid for by the people of Derby and gifted to Sunderland. Copies of the photograph were presented to Her Majesty the Queen and His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales.

In 1872, The Prince of Wales and Princess Alexandra visited Derby, arriving by Royal Train at the Midland Road train station. Their procession would have taken them directly past Winter’s studio on Midland Road and he is recorded as paying a subscription towards the decoration of the town for the visit of the Prince and Princess of Wales to the sum of 10s6d.

The visit drew large crowds and the subscription was an opportunity for Winter to both support the town and raise his profile. By 1875 adverts appeared in a Derby newspaper describing the studio as ‘The Alexandra Rooms’, suggesting that Winter had begun taking photographs of or for the royal family by this time. It could, however, have been a clever marketing tool – Princess Alexandra was a keen amateur photographer herself; but we know from our photographic records that Winter was definitely selected to take royal photography, including royal groups at Chatsworth. By 1883 he was advertising his business as ‘Patronised by Her Majesty the Queen’.

Local Board Representative

By April 1875 Walter William Winter had been voted on to the Litchurch Local Board as the representative for Park Ward.

Today the legacy of Litchurch exists only in street names and a street sign on the corner of Normanton Road and Grove Street. The current ward is unrelated to the township. The area was reabsorbed into the borough of Derby in the late 1870’s, and later further erased when much of its housing was destroyed to make way for the expansion of the Derby Royal Infirmary in the 1970s.

Litchurch covered a triangular area south from the railway junction. We can clearly see its boundaries from the street addresses given in “Poll Book for the Southern Division of the County of Derby, Shewing how Each Person Voted at the Contested Election, July 22, 1865.”

Highlighted – street names recorded as part of Litchurch in 1865

There were three wards of Litchurch (Arboretum Ward, Litchurch Ward, and Park Ward) and we speculate that Park Ward covered the area of Winter’s business on Midland Road (off which branches Park Road).

LITCHURCH, a village and a township in Derby-St. Peter parish, Derbyshire. The village stands on the S border of the township, 1½ mile ESE of Derby; is a new and rapidly increasing place; and has several large ironworks and foundries. The township is all suburban to Derby; contains the town’s railway station, and its arboretum; and has acquired great recent increase of population, in connexion with the railway traffic, and from other causes. Real property, £1,013,340; of which £996,643, are on the Midland railway. Pop. in 1851,1,720; in 1861, 6,560. Houses, 1,350. The Derby workhouse is here; and, at the census of 1861, had 222 inmates.

John Marius Wilson’s Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales 1870-72

In 1876 Winter was recorded as attending the Litchurch Board of Health monthly meeting and he continued to have links with local health services; an 1892 newspaper article lists him as a ‘house visitor’ for the Derbyshire Royal Infirmary. A house visitor was involved with the management and government of the hospital. He also made financial donations to the hospital.

Borough Council

In 1883, following two years serving as Mayor of Derby, Sir Abraham Woodiwiss was elevated to the Aldermanic Bench leaving a vacant seat on Litchurch Ward (by this time part of Derby). The local newspaper reveals that there was some posturing over who should stand for the seat between F. Strutt and W. W. Winter but eventually Winter, having had the previous experience on the Litchurch Local Board, stood unopposed.

Winter retained his position on the council until 1903 when he himself was elevated to the Aldermanic Bench. Three years later, in 1906, he also became a magistrate for Derby.

In 1884 the Derby Daily Telegraph listed nominations for the forthcoming election for the Board of Guardians for the Derby Union. The Boards administered workhouses and were elected by owners and occupiers of land liable to pay the poor rate (a tax used to provide poor relief). Under the heading ‘Township of Litchurch’, there is a listing for ‘W. W. Winter, Arboretum Street, photographer’. Arboretum Street was in fact the site of the workhouse at the time, which can still be seen today as the workhouse building was taken over by Royal Crown Derby Porcelain works.

Church Life

By 1878 Winter’s continuing work with the church is documented in his membership of two associations: Secretary of The Working Mens Branch of the Derby Auxiliary of The Church Association; and member of Trinity Church Young Men’s Christian Association (YMCA).

Trinity Church featured heavily in Winter’s life and he conducted Bible classes, carried out the role of churchwarden, and was a member of the Trinitarian Bible Society. Other newspaper references list him as chairing lectures for the Protestant Alliance outside of Derby.

In his role as Alderman, he advocates for the suspension of trams on Sundays (although retaining the same wages for tram drivers). A newspaper obituary also records him declining an invitation to photograph King Edward VII at Chatsworth on a Sunday.

Businessman

Our legacy from Walter William Winter is in his photographs and studio but his business ventures stretched further.

Alongside photography and picture framing he also sold fancy goods and held substantial art exhibitions and auctions, and seems to also have owned or let rooms to a café. It was possible to learn the trade alongside him – his staff wages books show that a few of his staff gained promotions with increased wages, and others went on to practice through their own businesses. There are many adverts in the local press in 1887 for Frederick J. Boyes photographer (late with W. W. Winter) on Osmaston Street where Boyes is clearly trading on Winter’s reputation.

There was a charming article in the Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal on 6 June 1884 which described a ‘Trip to Dovedale of Mr W. W. Winter’s Firm.’ The staff plus a few friends made up a group of forty three! They travelled into the Peak District by horse drawn carriages. The party stopped for lunch at the Peveril of the Peak Hotel. Winter was reported as congratulating his staff on their assiduity which had culminated in being awarded a medal and first-class diploma for the excellence of their work. He went on to win over sixty medals for his photography (some internationally) and it is nice to think that the achievement was shared amongst his staff.

In 1893 there was a review of the Derby Photographic Society Exhibition (at the School of Art) in the Derby Mercury. There were 366 photographs on view and the paper reported:

Mr W. W. Winter was very prominent with some capital portraits—platinotypes—including “Maggie,” “Jackey the Sweep,” “Kathleen,” “Mabel,” “Old and Rare,” &c. All of them showed a wonderful attention to detail, and were splendidly finished.

He maintains a royal connection and on 19 January 1900 his Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal advert includes the following:

Mr Winter has the pleasure of announcing his having been honoured with special sittings by Her Royal highness the Duchess of York.

In 1904 Winter was the president for the Derby Chamber of Trade. A note in the Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal stated it was, “In no sense […] a rival to the Chamber of Commerce. The duties of the two bodies are quite distinct, but at the same time, […] there are matters in which the two bodies can work together. […] The president (Mr. Ald. Winter) referred to the question of municipal telephones, and pointed out the importance upon advocating at every possible occasion the adoption of such as scheme.” In light of this it is interesting to note that the original phone number for W. W. Winter was 24.

Retirement

By 1910 Winter was 67 years of age but still had two teenage children. It is not clear what brought about his final decision to retire but there were mentions of his son’s health so perhaps this was the catalyst for the move. He sold his business to Messrs. Sheppard and King. In April 1910 there was a flurry of Derby newspaper articles reporting on new appointments to replace Winter on various committees including the borough development committee, the estates committee, the special drainage committee, and as manager of Canal Street School on the education committee.

He was thanked heartily for his civic service, and also by his church who threw him a farewell party

Canada

The shipping manifest lists W. W. Winter as ‘Farmer’, and he and his family probably worked a plot of land alongside more established earlier pioneer families in Happy Valley, Metchosin (British Columbia).

His lasting dedication was to his faith and he built Trinity Mission Hall in Metchosin and became ordained in to the ministry of the Reformed Episcopal Church.

 

The Gospel Magazine – March 1925

A Surprise Visit!

We had a fabulous Heritage Open Days weekend – it is such a pleasure introducing people to the history of Winters, and learning about your own experiences of having photographs taken in the studio. This year though, we had the most brilliant surprise – a visit from a great-grandchild of W W Winter himself! Sam popped over from the other side of the world and spent a few days here with us at the studio. He was kind enough to send us the following tribute after his departure…

The Magic of Winters

There are times in the journey of life when it seems that we are on a river that flows gently and sweetly through a land of forest and undulating grasslands. But rivers, as does life, have times of chaos, danger, heartache and pain before the current sweeps through into areas of peace, areas of rest – sections of a river where we can ease onto a grassy bank and recover and reflect on the journey that we have just undertaken. Some of those places have a certain magic about them. A peace that soothes the wounds of life and gives glimpses of a heritage that is both greater than you, and yet is you.

My past nine months have been filled with heartache, unfulfilled hopes and deep loss. On impulse, I directed myself from Australia to W.W. Winters Ltd in Derby. A place, I hoped, would help me find peace and purpose in my life; because for me, Winters Ltd was not only a journey into my past, but thanks to the beautiful people that make up Winters Ltd today, an anchor for my future.

There is a magic to Winters, and I cannot say for sure that it is sourced from the people who are Winters now, or whether it is the amazing building itself which is filled with history, lost rooms and unexplained and non-aligned joining’s and filled in archways. Or, perhaps, it lies in the 152 years of images that line the rooms and corridors and speak of a time long past yet also of today.

I have no sense of loss whatsoever from my great-grandfather W.W. Winter selling the business in 1910 to Messer’s Shepherd and King. Rather I am filled with appreciation for the current owners and staff both for their skill in photography and running the business, and for their passion in realising W.W. Winters as an integral part of not just Derby’s, but England’s history.

There is a magic to Winter’s – and I am blessed because of it.

Thank you.

Sam

Volunteer Blog

More from one of our brilliant volunteers – does anyone recognise themselves from the photos?

Where are they now? – Nick Allen

I’m one of the volunteers here at the W.W.Winter photographic studio on Midland Road, Derby. My wife and I are part of a small team of volunteers helping to clean, scan and catalogue thousands of glass plate negatives which are part of the W.W.Winter Trust.
In just over 6 months we’ve collated almost 7 boxes of glass sides dating from the late 1940’s up through the 50’s, that’s about 1500 separate images. Most of the images have been of weddings and portraits but every so often you find a rare gem amongst the general photography.
Whilst scanning today we came across a series of head and shoulders portraits taken in the studio in 1948, which we believe were of a dance troop. All were photographs of females including young girls and adults, all similarly dressed as if for a musical show. The glass negatives had been masked off and we believe they may have been publicity photographs or taken for a show programme. We also believe the dance school was based in the Friar Gate area and we’d love to hear from anyone who may recognise someone from the photographs shown! Contact us on friends@wwwinter.co.uk

Scans from the masked off negatives from The W W Winter heritage Archive
Scans from the masked off negatives from The W W Winter Heritage Archive

 

Hubert Weston King 1931 – 2018

OBITUARY

Hubert Weston King was born on 23rd January, 1931 in Normanton, Derby, the eldest son of Howard and Jesse King. Educated at the Diocesan School in Friargate, Derby, Hubert left school at the age of 14 to join the family firm of W W Winter Ltd, photographers, of Midland Road, Derby as an apprentice under the direction of his uncle, Austin King, and his grandfather W H King, the then managing director.

In his youth, Hubert always thought that he would like to become an engineer. Unfortunately, he suffered from severe asthma and his grandfather said that taking on engineering job would ‘finish him’ and it was agreed that Hubert should join the family firm. Hubert said quite recently that his asthma had disappeared quickly after he started work at Winter’s, mainly, he thought, because the environment at the firm was so cold in the winters.

Hubert was fortunate to be taught by his grand­father W H King who passed on to Hubert much of the knowledge and experience he had accumulated since the 1890s. This tuition took place over many years as Hubert’s grandfather didn’t retire until 1947.

One of Hubert’s first jobs was to wash developed photographic prints to remove all traces of chemicals. This was done with bare hands in cold running water. In those days, making prints was carried out in daylight in all weathers in an open area at the very top of the building. Hubert said that frequently a lot of ice had to be broken before any work could be done.

Hubert’s early years at Winter’s coincided with a successful time for Derby County Football Club. The company had been the official photographers for many years and when the Rams won the FA Cup in 1946, they asked Winter’s to photograph the team with the trophy. It must have been a tremendous honour for the fifteen year old Hubert to be given the task of carrying the Cup on to the pitch to be photographed.

Hubert was taught all aspects of photography by his grandfather, his uncle and the other staff at the firm, who were consummate portraitists and commercial photographers and who had built up the business to encompass a wide range of industrial and commercial clients. Having mastered the art of daylight printing, Hubert was then taught the skills of print retouching (in the comparative warmth of the retouching room).

In 1949 Hubert started a four-year City and Guilds evening course at Nottingham College of Arts and Crafts. Unlike the other students, Hubert already had a wide knowledge of the practical side of photography and this gave him a special rapport with the tutor, a Mr. Harry Beaumont, who taught him the theory and understanding of more advanced photographic applications. Towards the end of the course, Hubert had to prepare a portfolio which included some studio photography.

Following his qualification, Hubert joined the team at Winter’s full-time and practised his craft there right up until a few years ago. He worked extensively with Mr Charles (Charlie) Barson, for whom he had an enormous regard and with whom he developed a close and lifelong friendship. Hubert had many stories about their working together on locations including what today would be considered very dangerous commissions. At one time, the pair climbed up the cooling towers at one of the newly built Trent valley power stations—Health and Safety was a lot more lax then. With another colleague, Hubert took a trip in a cable car very high above the ground and took shots by hanging on at the open door of the cable car in order to produce the required shots.

Hubert was a member of the British Institute of Professional Photography from 1968 until his death. He was treasurer and president of the East Midlands Region of the Institute and had received awards in full recognition of his service.

Following his uncle Austin King’s retirement in 1975, Hubert became Winter’s managing director.

Hubert’s tenure at Winter’s saw huge changes in photography. When he started, the equipment was bulky and heavy, there was no electric flash and negatives were large and made of glass. The technology at the time presented many limitations. As the years went by, film cameras were introduced and electric lighting allowed photography to take place out of daylight hours. Digital photography was the next revolution, giving skilled photographers like Hubert opportunities to acquire many new and different techniques. Hubert immediately embraced all aspects of digital working, realising that so many of the old time-consuming aspects of photography could now be superseded, with better results, by the use of computers. He always pointed out though that what counts most in all photography is the person behind the camera.

Hubert remained at Winter’s for the whole of his working life, retiring only in 2016 due to failing health. He died on 25th December 2018 after a short illness.

He was a hugely practical man and there is so much in the building at Winter’s studios in Midland Road today which exists as a testament to his ingenuity and skills. This involved much use of his circular saw in the cellar! He wouldn’t hesitate to build a new photographic background, put in a stud wall, build a new work bench and so on. Problem-solving was his forte.

Hubert was always passionate about Winter’s and the company’s historic significance to Derby and the wider photographic world. It was important to him that Winter’s should continue after his death and he was fully supportive of the Winter’s Heritage Trust which was set up in 2017 to preserve, protect and archive the collection of photographic plates, artefacts and memorabilia at the studio. Hubert’s family, colleagues and friends will ensure that his legacy continues, and that Winter’s continues to thrive and retain its place in the history of photography.